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Government rates Quintana Roo municipalities as medium, low for violence

Cancun, Q.R. — According to the upcoming security plan of the National Guard, four municipalities of Quintana Roo are rated as medium and low for levels of violence in the country.

As of October, the country will implement its new Guardia Nacional security plan to help better control violence around Mexico. The new federal government program has assigned four municipalities in the state of Quintana Roo as medium or low for levels of violence.

Those listed are Benito Juárez as medium, Cozumel with a low level of violence, Solidaridad with a medium level of violence and Othón P. Blanco also with a low level of violence.

Other municipalities to make the regional list include Yucatan, with the cities of Mérida, Valladolid, Ticul and Progreso all being classified as low.

Credit: México SOS

The federal government’s new National Guard will consist of 22,000 members from the state’s Navy, Secretariat of National Defense (Sedena) and the Secretariat of Security and Citizen Protection (SSPC) who have classified the municipalities.

On their list of most violent municipalities are Mexicali, Tecate, Tijuana, Ensenada, La Paz, Los Cabos, Chihuahua, Ciudad Juárez, Piedras Negras, Torreón, Colima, to name a few, which according to the organization México SOS, is coincident with the Peña Nieto’s six-year program.

According to México SOS however, their strategy has left out more than 100 municipalities with problems of insecurity and violence, such as the case of Quintana Roo where the municipalities of Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Isla Mujeres, Lázaro Cárdenas and Tulum were left out.

The say that the managers proposed for the regions have already had meetings with the Mesas de Seguridad de Quintana Roo derived from the work and results carried out in previous years, to start operating the new security strategy.

In a position released in January, México SOS and la Red Nacional de Mesas de Seguridad y Justicia said that the National Guard cannot, nor should be thought of as a final and unique solution and that dialogue cannot be ignored with the governments of the states and municipalities to build long-term solutions.